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  1. #1
    RC Competitor
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    Rusltler wheels & tires.

    If I buy 1/8 buggy wheels, how can I prevent wear on parts like the servo, motor, and misc. Front and rear plastic parts? I have heard horror stories about rustler vxls and buggy wheels.

  2. #2
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Petertje60's Avatar
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    That is like asking how to prevent going fast on full throttle. Bigger tires just put more stress on parts. No steering when standing still lowers stress on your servo. I think more weight on wheels increases stress more than just bigger wheels, so if you want bigger wheels, pick light ones.
    Nobody is born with experience

  3. #3
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    Larger tires increases gearing so you'll need to gear down anyway. Plus you've added rotating weight for which you should gear down even further if don't want to increase the strain on the motor/batts.

    As long as you have a high torque servo I would think it would hold up OK as it's still only a 2WD.
    Pretty please, with sugar on top, clean the RC car

  4. #4
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    I think your servo should be fine as seeing as it is 2wd as wolf pointed out the servo is not trying to turn against the wheels rotating of a 4wd.

    and what are these horror stories you've heard of vxlmaster?
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  5. #5
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    How far should I gear down with a stock vxl system?

  6. #6
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    Assuming you're currently geared OK, a good starting point would be to reduce gearing so that you get the same roll out ratio. The roll out ratio is how far the car moves for a single rpm of the motor. Measure the circumference of the tire (or estimate it by measuring diameter and multiplying by 3.14) and divide it by the final drive ratio of the transmission. FDR = (spur teeth / pinion teeth) x 2.72. One inch per RPM is normally considered a reasonable place to be.

    Other factors come into play (running surface, vehicle weight, ambient temp etc) so really the best thing is to get a temp gun and find the happy spots yourself. I gave you the above advice just to help you to estimate a good starting point and adjust for the larger tires.
    Last edited by Mr Wolf; 11-19-2011 at 11:51 PM.
    Pretty please, with sugar on top, clean the RC car

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