Revo 3.3 Setup and Tuning Guide (Part 4)


As many of you know, the Revo 3.3 is a high-performance 4-wheel drive monster truck that is very capable on the track. The Revo 3.3 has won nearly every major monster truck racing event, and has taken home the gold in every national championship that it has entered. However, these wins weren't achieved by pulling it out of the box, dropping in a random set up at the track, and pulling the trigger. There are many things to consider when preparing your Revo for serious competition. This applies to all levels of racing. Even if you're a weekend warrior at your local track, a better prepared truck will always give you an advantage over the competition, no matter who you are.

This guide is designed to compliment and enhance my previous set up series on the Revo (Revo Performance Setup Guide part 1, 2 & 3). The original Revo setup guide will assist you by explaining the basics of tuning the Revo suspension as well as many other aspects of the truck. This Revo 3.3 setup guide will get your Revo up-to-date with current setup tips and tricks that I (along with other Traxxas team drivers) are currently using to achieve maximum performance from our race Revos. I highly recommend referring to the original setup series for additional info or questions you may have when reading this guide.

I'll walk you through the "how's & why's" of each tip and modification that I use as I rebuild my personal Revo 3.3 for its next race. I'll also follow up with a Revo 3.3 base setup sheet to follow for prepping your own Revo 3.3 for your next race. Let's get started.

There are five things to remember before setting up your chassis and suspension:

Mechanics first
It's very important to understand that an ill-handling truck is often caused by a mechanical problem rather than by a particular setting. For example, a screw fastener may be missing or a suspension component may be bent or broken, inhibiting the suspension from moving freely. If the truck is not mechanically sound, adjusting the settings will have little or no benefit. Therefore, it must be assumed that the truck is mechanically functioning properly before moving forward. This includes the following:
  • No binding in the suspension or steering, front/rear
  • Smooth and consistent operation of the shock absorbers
  • No excess bind or drag in the drive system
  • Suspension settings are equal, left to right
Evaluate before making changes
Effective tuning begins with an effective evaluation of the truck's performance. Rather than conclude your truck is "just not working", try to analyze and pin point where (in a certain turn or jump section) or when (accelerating, braking, etc.) the truck is not performing well. It can be helpful to ask yourself specific questions like 'Do I have enough steering into/through/out-of the turn?'; 'Is the truck accelerating well or is it spinning out when I apply throttle?'; 'Is the truck responsive enough or does it feel too reactive or twitchy?' Knowing which areas are not working as well as they should, will allow you to narrow down the setting that you should try adjusting.
Tuning is usually a compromise:
Improving one area of performance typically means reducing performance in another area. By increasing steering into a turn, you often lose steering out of the turn. By gearing for more acceleration, you will lose a little top speed. Stiffening the suspension may increase responsiveness, but may make the truck more difficult to drive. It's all about the best possible compromise and how you feel when driving the truck.
Only make one change at a time:
To effectively tune your race truck, it's best to make one change at a time. If you make more than one change at a time, it will make it difficult to determine which change made the difference. Even if multiple changes improved the truck's performance, it would be difficult to tell which change made the best result. It is possible this can backfire and decrease the truck's performance, which will leave you not knowing which change was most effective.
It's best to just make one change and if it improves performance, then continuing in that direction will help get you to where you want to be. If the change causes a negative outcome, then you'll know exactly what the change affected and will help you better learn what you should or should not change at the next track you race on. If you do not feel a change in the truck from making an adjustment, then try timing your laps to see if an improvement was made. Less experienced drivers may not feel each change, but the effects of the change may be seen in the lap times.
Don't hesitate to experiment
Each driver has their own preference of how they want their truck to feel. One driver's setup may feel awkward to another driver. There is basically no single 'one' best setup for every driver. Use the Revo tuning guides to better understand what effects each change will make, and then experiment with these changes to better suit your driving style and your particular track condition. It's also beneficial to keep a record of the changes you made and how it affected the truck on the particular track you were driving on.

Important: Some of the following modifications require the use of a rotary power tool for cutting and grinding. Always wear eye protection when using a rotary power tool.

Revo 3.3 Tips and Tricks

Chassis

First, I start by disassembling the entire truck, and thoroughly clean each component as I reassemble. I inspect each component for cracks, wear or any kind of deformity. I replace these components with new pieces to keep my truck in the best shape possible. This also keeps the truck feeling consistent on the track. If any component is neglected too long, the truck may develop bad characteristics that can be difficult to tune out down the road, or even worse, the component may fail during a very important race, and leave you with a DNF.

Next, I inspect the chassis plate for any cracks or bends, looking carefully around the front end and the engine mount area. Impacts to the front end of the truck and the engine itself can flex the engine mount plate up and down eventually forming a crack in one of the radiuses. If you are continuously stripping spur gears and you know that your gear mesh and engine mount are good, then this is usually the place to check. If the chassis is cracked, it will need to be replaced.

I begin the assembly process by attaching the small plastic pieces to the chassis plate along with the engine mount brace and roll bar. It's important to insert the rear diff locater in the proper direction. The piece should lean toward the front of the chassis.

Using the extra thick M2C Racing® engine mount brace will provide reinforcement to a larger area, and is machined from extra thick aluminum for additional support.

I grind a little bit of material from the inside of the roll bar where the throttle linkage passes by. The stock setup is generally fine, but since I use a larger servo horn for the throttle linkage, the extra clearance is necessary to prevent the throttle linkage from binding with the roll bar.

Miscellaneous items in this section
Rotary power tool (for cutting and grinding)
Wear eye protection when using a rotary power tool
M2C Racing® engine mount brace

Front end

Moving forward, I start the assembly of the front end. First, I disassemble the differential and inspect the gears and housing for wear. I replace the old fluid with new diff fluid. My personal preference is to use Traxxas diff fluid, and I usually run between 30K (#5136) and 50K (#5137) weight in the front diff or a combination of the two to achieve a viscosity level in between.

When installing the assembled diff into the case half, I apply Traxxas thrust bearing lube (#2717) to the ring and pinion gears. Greasing this area decreases wear and extends the life of the gears.

Using a rotary tool, I grind away material from the bulkhead halves just below the steering links. This provides clearance for the rod ends to move more freely when the suspension arms are extended or unloaded, such as when accelerating or lifting from a bump or jump.

Extra caster is attained by removing material from the bulkhead halves and upper suspension arms. By grinding away 2.0mm from the back of the suspension arm pivot locations and 2.0mm from the bulkhead halves (just behind the arms) two extra caster clips can be installed in front of the upper arms for increased caster. The harder you drive your Revo, the more you will benefit from the extra caster. This trick helps by calming the truck down when steering through bumpy and rutted out corners. It also helps to calm down high speed steering on and off throttle on any surface. Try just one clip at a time to get the feel of the difference.

Modifying the steering bell crank and removing the steering stops from the lower hinge pin retainer is a commonly known trick to provide your front wheels with more steering throw/angle. Bevel the upper/outer edges of the bell crank and remove the steering stops from the lower hinge pin retainer so that the bell crank can rotate further side to side. Also note that you will need to remove some material from the top of the retainer where the steering arm meets the retainer. I use a Pro-Line® aluminum steering arm in place of the stock plastic unit for extra durability. A longer servo arm will be required to utilize this mod to its fullest potential.

Revo 3.3 Setup and Tuning Guide Part IVRevo 3.3 Setup and Tuning Guide Part IV

Front end showing maximum steering angleFront end showing maximum steering angle

The extra steering throw will allow your hub carriers to be limited by the pivot ball shafts. I grind away a little bit of material from the shaft just next to the ball (where they meet with the carrier). Make a path about 3.0mm wide and approximately 0.5mm deep all the way around the shaft. A lathe would be the ideal way to turn the shafts down, but if you are smooth and steady with a rotary tool, the same result can be achieved. Just a little bit of grinding makes a big difference, so don't get too carried away. Removing too much material will definitely weaken the shafts and they'll be much more prone to bending or breaking.

Make sure to locate your steering links in the upper most location in the hub carriers to accommodate the extra caster. The extra caster may still induce a bit of bump steer, but it is minimal, and poses no real negative effect.

I've used RD Racing® aluminum hub carriers for a few years now, and they are solid. I also choose the 8.0mm axles for extra strength and reliability. Large 8x16mm bearings are used with these axles/carriers for long life. The plastic pivot ball caps are locked in with set screws to keep them in place. I also use M2C Racing machined aluminum 17mm hex hub adapters for the use of 17mm hex wheels. The larger hex distributes power efficiently and prevents stripping of the wheel hex in plastic racing wheels. These units are lightweight and the cross pins run from end to end for maximum strength.

Revo 3.3 Setup and Tuning Guide Part IVRevo 3.3 Setup and Tuning Guide Part IV

I strongly recommend Traxxas TUBES™ (#5338R) toe links for the Revo 3.3. They stand up to the abuse of racing and they look cool. I also use Traxxas aluminum pushrods with steel inserts (#5318X) in place of the stock steel pieces. They resist bending and also look sharp.

I generally start with the pushrods mounted in the middle location, and use a shim on each end (stock P2 setup) with P2 rockers. This setup is the best base starting point on most tracks that I have raced on and is what I usually find myself going back to at many races. I'll remove a shim from each push rod to decrease down travel when needed. I choose to run as little down travel as the track will allow. It's more responsive in the corners, but can be a little sketchy when it gets too bumpy. The same result can be achieved by moving the rod to the outer location. The inner location will increase down travel and will calm the truck down in the corners and from hard jump landings. Too much down travel isn't recommended for high bite tracks though.

Parts used in this section
Part Number Part Name
#5136 Traxxas differential fluid 30K weight
#5137 Traxxas differential fluid 50K weight
#2717 Traxxas thrust bearing lube
#5338R Traxxas TUBES™ toe links
#5318X Traxxas aluminum pushrods with steel inserts
Miscellaneous items
Rotary power tool (for cutting and grinding)
Wear eye protection when using a rotary power tool
Pro-Line® aluminum steering arm
RD Racing® aluminum hub carriers
8.0mm axles
Large 8x16mm bearings
M2C Racing machined aluminum 17mm hex hub adapters

Rear end

Like the front end, I start by going through the diff. I generally use between 10K (#5135) and 30K (#5136) weight in the rear diff. Mixing these weights 50/50 will achieve a 20K weight feel, which I prefer to use for a variety of track conditions.

Traxxas TUBES™ toe links and aluminum push rods are used out back, as well. Down travel is adjusted the same way as the front, and I use the same setting as the front for base setup - two shims on the rod and the rod located in the middle position.

I use the Traxxas Revo extended wheelbase suspension arms (#5333R) in the rear to increase the wheelbase of my Revo. I generally use the longest extension of 19mm.

Completed rear endCompleted rear end

Parts used in this section
Part Number Part Name
#5135 Traxxas differential fluid 10K weight
#5136 Traxxas differential fluid 30K weight
#5333R Traxxas Revo extended wheelbase suspension arms

Electronics

Moving to the radio gear and receiver box, I start by installing the steering servo. As I mentioned earlier, a longer servo arm is needed to get the full potential from the steering modifications made to the front end. With that being said, some clearance may be needed to allow the servo arm to get maximum steering angle. Remove only the amount of material needed from the guard.

I use two small zip-ties to hinge the battery door to the receiver box. This makes it convenient when removing the battery pack, and also keeps the door from popping out after hard jump landings. I use a Ballistic Batteries™ five-cell 1400 Mah battery pack that is hand soldered by Ballistic Batteries. They're very reliable battery packs for long mains. The personal transponder fits neatly inside the receiver box, so no extra mounting plates are necessary. I use a 2.4 GHz receiver and transmitter module for flawless control over the servos. A cutout in back of the box is made to clear the larger 145cc fuel tank that I am running in the stock location (more on this later). However, I did slightly reposition one of the end cells of my Ballistic Battery Pack to the top end of the pack to fit inside the stock box.

To mount the throttle servo, I use an Extreme Racing™ throttle servo mount for the Revo. This unit is made with dual graphite plates and tied together by four aluminum posts. This mount is as stiff as they come and reduces flex under heavy braking. I recommend using a strong high-end metal gear servo with this mount as the extra flex is reduced that normally prevents budget servos from over-working. I custom-shaped a large round servo horn so that I could relocate the throttle and brake linkages to my preferred positions. Different locations can provide more or less throw and can also alter the rate curve of the linkages. I generally like more throw and higher rates for faster response. However, this puts a little more strain on the servo, so a good race servo is suggested for this as well.

I use a lighter gauge throttle return spring on my Revo to keep extra stress off of the servo. I use the Traxxas spring (#4045) from the Nitro 4-Tec. I also drilled a small hole into the throttle bell crank for the throttle return spring. The lighter gauge spring has a tendency of breaking prematurely when hooked onto the metal throttle rod. The extra hole in the bell crank allows the spring to hook into plastic, which is a lot more forgiving than the throttle rod.

Parts used in this section
Part Number Part Name
#4045 Traxxas spring (from the Nitro 4-Tec)
Miscellaneous items
Rotary power tool (for cutting and grinding)
Wear eye protection when using a rotary power tool
Zip-ties (small)
Ballistic Batteries™ five-cell 1400 Mah battery pack
2.4 GHz receiver and transmitter module
Extreme Racing™ throttle servo mount

Fuel tank & mount

I use an aftermarket 145cc fuel tank made for 1/8-scale truggies to maximize fuel capacity for sanctioned racing. To mount the larger tank into the stock location, I had to make a mounting plate from Kydex® plastic. There are many tanks out there that may require different methods of mounting them onto the chassis. This is just an example of what you can do to fit a larger tank onto your Revo. Keep in mind that I use the extended wheelbase suspension arms, which are a must for using any tank longer than the stock unit. This tank together with the appropriate length of fuel line stretches my fuel capacity to just under the legal limit of 150cc. This equates to about two to three minutes of extra runtime versus the stock tank, which makes a difference of being able to pit at the 10 minute mark or not.

Miscellaneous items in this section
Rotary power tool (for cutting and grinding)
Wear eye protection when using a rotary power tool
Aftermarket 145cc fuel tank (made for 1/8-scale truggies)
Kydex® plastic

Shocks and sway bars

After mounting the fuel tank, I move on to prepping the shocks for installation. As a rule, I generally run one weekend of racing on the same shock oil to maintain consistent performance. So, I usually replace the shock oil when I'm going through the rest of the truck. A good base setup for damping is the #2 pistons all the way around with 50wt shock oil. In warmer conditions, I recommend 55 to 60wt fluid. I use Traxxas hard-anodized shocks with titanium nitride coated shafts (#5460X) for long wear. The PTFE-coated shock bodies reduce wear inside the shock dramatically and last a long time. You'll see the difference as soon as you change shock fluid. It will be fairly clear instead of a dirty dark gray color. Up front I use green springs (#5438) and thread the rod end up all the way onto the shaft, also using the blue rubber bump stop.

I prefer to use gold springs (#5439) on the rear shocks and double-up with two upper threaded collars to keep the retainers from jumping threads at high pre-load settings. I thread the rod ends all the way and use the blue bump stop on the rears, as well.

Sway bars have been extremely beneficial to me at almost every track I've raced on. I highly recommend equipping your Revo with a set of the Traxxas sway bars (#5498). They are very instrumental in reducing chassis roll in corners, which equates to faster corner speeds. They are adjustable and come with different bar sizes. I still use the original prototype rear bar configuration, since I run the exhaust down the side of the truck. This frees up room for me to make adjustments to the shocks, and to perform any maintenance to the back end of the truck without having to remove the exhaust pipe and header. The Traxxas unit works just the same, but relocates the linkage to the bottom of the rear rocker arms providing clearance for the stock rear exhaust location.

Up front, I use the 1.9mm bar and a 3.0mm bar in the back. Start with a light setting at first. As you get adjusted to using them, start tightening them up until you can drive as hard as you like without getting too sketchy. After I find a good position for the front, I will adjust the rear bar for more or less steering response. The tighter the rear setting, the more response, and the opposite is true with a lighter setting.

Parts used in this section
Part Number Part Name
#5460X Traxxas hard-anodized PTFE-coated GTR shocks
#5438 Traxxas Green springs
#5439 Traxxas Gold springs
#5498 Traxxas sway bars
Miscellaneous items
50wt - 60wt shock oil (mix for desired weight)

Transmission

Prior to assembling the transmission, I inspect all of the gears for wear and all of the bearings for smooth operation. If a bearing feels gritty or is packed with grease and doesn't spin smoothly, I will clean it and re-lube with a good quality bearing lube. If this doesn't fix the problem, I simply replace the bearing. After checking all of the bearings and cleaning the interior of the tranny case halves, I install the gears. I'm installing a new set of gears into the transmission for photo purposes.

Before I assemble the gears together, I check the primary shaft for excessive wear or any imperfections that may cause trouble for the one-way bearing. If the shaft is fine, I'll clean it and re-lube the area that the one-way spins on with a mineral-based lube. Sewing machine oil works great for one-way bearings.

I typically use the close-ratio (#5383) two-speed gear set everywhere I race. The shorter second gear ratio works great with the TRX 3.3 power band and pulls hard in second gear. It also allows for smoother shifts and makes the truck easier to drive in faster sections of the track.

The transmission gears were intended to be run dry. This is fine, but the smaller two-speed gear cluster tends to wear when running the truck hard on the track. I used to replace the two-speed gear set on a scheduled basis, but I have found that Traxxas silicon grease (#1647) is a great (and safe) lube for the plastic gears and doesn't pose any problems to the rest of the transmission. I apply several dabs of the grease spaced evenly around each gear and rotate the gears until the entire gear is covered. My two-speed gears seem to last forever using this grease. I also use this grease on the primary gear. When I open up my tranny after a race weekend, the inside of the tranny is clean and free of gear dust and the gears are in excellent shape.

I also use the Revo center differential (#5414) in my transmission along with the rear brake kit (#5417). The center diff allows you to apply more throttle with less correction when driving through the rough or on surfaces with inconsistent traction. The rear brake gives you control of the front and rear brakes independently. I dial in the rear brake to actuate before the front brake to help set up for corners. Too much front brake can cause a push, but too much rear brake can cause the rear end to wash out in the corners. Try to find a good balance for each track condition.

I replaced the stock front brake rotor with the vented disc rotor (#5364X) from Traxxas. The stock brake rotor works great, but can overheat when really working hard. The vented rotor from Traxxas stops the truck just as well, but never seems to fade. I can always depend on the braking power staying consistent with this brake rotor. A little trick I use to keep the calipers from dragging on the rotor while under acceleration is to install small ball point pen springs between the calipers. Trim the springs so that the calipers can clamp onto the rotor without trouble, but leave them long enough to spread the calipers out after releasing the brake.

After assembling the transmission, I inspect the spur gear for excessive wear. If the gear is chipped or has missing teeth, it usually means that the slipper is too tight. It's best to disassemble the slipper system and check the components for cracks or corrosion. Replace any damaged pieces and replace the slipper nut if the nylon locking material is worn out. This will cause your slipper to loosen during operation. I generally use the 38T (#3954) spur gear, but sometimes I switch to the 40T (#3955) gear to keep the engine's rpm up on smaller tracks.

After setting the transmission into the chassis opening, I connect the front and rear brake linkage. I replaced the flexible Z-bend rear brake rod with a solid turnbuckle link. This setup applies 100% of the servo's power to the rear brakes. I prefer a powerful rear brake system, and this was the best way to eliminate flex in the linkage. I connect the link to the servo horn with 3.0mm hardware and install a rod end with hollow ball onto the screw so that the link can pivot and rotate freely on the servo horn. On the other end, I installed a large thumbscrew to make quick brake adjustments easy.

Once the linkage is attached, I flip the truck over and install the transmission skid plate. Another trick I use is to tie the tranny skid to the rear skid using the center section of another tranny skid plate (#5337). I remove the legs from the skid plate and join all three skids together with 3.0mm hardware. It's best to mark your holes with the tranny and rear skids mounted on the truck. Locate the tranny skid hole so that the screw is positioned between the two engine mount side plates. The rear hole should be located so that the screw goes all the way through the center of the rear skid and exits just behind the rear bulkhead. Leave enough room for a 3.0mm nylon lock nut to secure the screw.

This trick provides a couple of benefits. First, it saves the rear skid from wearing through, which will expose the rear suspension pins. Some tracks are abrasive enough to wear all the way through the rear skid during a long main. This allows your suspension pins to fall out and the suspension arms to separate from the chassis. The extra skid keeps this from happening and provides more skid area for longer skid life. The extra skid also over laps the front portion of the rear skid and provides a smoother transition over large bumps and pot holes. It also helps keep the truck from catching the top of jumps and bucking the rear end over the front after casing a jump. Just replace the extra skid when it wears down to the rear skid. You can also replace the rear screw intermittently to extend the life of the extra skid. Keep in mind that you may need to modify your starter box to accept the extra skid, depending on which starter box you use. It's cheap and easy to maintain once you've made the modification. Plus, no more lost rear suspension pins.

Parts used in this section
Part Number Part Name
#5383 Traxxas close-ratio two-speed gear set
#1647 Traxxas silicon grease
#5414 Traxxas Revo center differential
#5417 Traxxas Revo rear brake kit
#5364X Traxxas vented disc rotor
#3954 Traxxas 38T spur gear
#3955 Traxxas 40T spur gear
#5337 Traxxas skid plate set
Miscellaneous items
Rotary power tool (for cutting and grinding)
Wear eye protection when using a rotary power tool
Sewing machine oil
Small springs (from ball point pen)
Solid turnbuckle link
3.0mm hardware
Rod end with hollow ball
Large thumbscrew
Starter box

Engine and exhaust

Now, the chassis is ready for engine and exhaust installation. The first thing I do before installing a new engine is to get it ready for a starter box and also ensure everything is assembled correctly. I usually remove the starter pin from the crankshaft with a rotary cutoff wheel, but you can replace the crankshaft with one that already has this pin removed (crankshaft #5288R). The backplate will also need to be replaced with a standard plate (#5274R) made to be used with starter boxes.

Next, I align the carburetor and check the settings for break-in. The carburetor should be slightly canted clockwise as you look down over the top of it. Make sure that the o-rings located in the block are in good shape and that the carburetor is pressed down into the block firmly before tightening the pinch bolt to prevent air leaks. I always remove the high speed needle from the carburetor to make sure there is no foreign debris on the needle that can block fuel. The tip of the needle should be smooth. Next, check the throttle arm on the carburetor. The arm should point straight down.

I prefer to use a three-shoe aluminum clutch system in my race Revo, even though the stock shoes work quite well. M2C Racing makes a solid three-shoe racing clutch for the Revo that is fully adjustable and lasts a long time. There are multiple shoe compounds and many spring rates to suit your driving style and conditions. I typically use a combination of medium to hard shoes with 0.95 and 1.0 springs.

Once the engine is mounted onto the chassis, I lube the throttle arm and bell crank with Traxxas white lithium grease (#5148). This helps keep dirt from scoring notches into the plastic bell crank and keeps throttle action smooth and consistent.

As I mentioned before, I route the exhaust down the side of my Revo using a 180-degree header coupled to a Traxxas Jato Resonator two-chamber exhaust pipe (#5485). The Jato pipe is compact and its oval shape helps it fit under the body and you can drill out the stinger for more power. The two-chamber design seems to work best with the TRX 3.3 and provides a very smooth power band. I attach the front of the pipe to the chassis using a coiled wire stand off. The coiled wire allows the pipe to flex up and down without bending the wire. Note the third zip-tie on the exhaust coupler. This is routed around the chassis between the engine mount and the chassis plate to keep the coupler from being pulled away from the chassis.

I replaced the stock air filter housing with a larger cylindrical 1/8-scale buggy racing air filter. This type of air filter provides more surface area for the engine to breathe and is crucial for long dusty mains. I use the stock inlet tube and join the large filter base with Shoe Goo®. I also glued a small piece of Lexan to the front of the inlet tube to guard the tube from the spur gear.

Parts used in this section
Part Number Part Name
#5288R Traxxas IPS crankshaft
#5274R Traxxas backplate
#5148 Traxxas white lithium grease
#5485 Traxxas Jato Resonator two-chamber exhaust pipe
Miscellaneous items
M2C Racing three-shoe racing clutch (medium to hard, 0.95 & 1.0 springs)
Zip-tie
1/8-scale buggy racing air filter (large cylindrical)
Shoe Goo®
Small piece of Lexan

Wheels and tires

Wheel and tire needs change from track to track, but the new LPR series of wheels and tires from Pro-Line bridge the gap between small athletic types and large forgiving setups. So far, they have been incredible on everything that I've used them on. The larger wheel diameter keeps the profile of the tire low while maintaining a large overall tire diameter. This combo lays the power down and reacts to ruts and bumps more effectively than the smaller wheels. However, they're not as wide as the 40-series setups that are a little too wide for most applications. The LPR series provide a good balance of handling, response, and most of all, traction. The Holeshot™ tread pattern can be used in most track conditions, and the BowTie™ tires are great for wet or sandy loam conditions. Note that the new Pro-Line LPR wheels are only available with 17mm hexes, so you'll need the appropriate adapters to fit these wheels. I also use the ½-inch offset wheels for more track width. This improves the stability of the truck tremendously.

I always balance each of my wheel and tire sets. Balancing the large wheels on your Revo improves traction and handling. It also makes the truck feel smooth and more predictable when driving. I use the wheel balancer from Ballistic Batteries™ because it accommodates 14mm, 17mm and 23mm wheel hexes, and includes a pack of balancing putty. Just apply a small amount of putty to the light side of the wheel until there is no heavy side to the wheel. The wheel should not rotate on its own at any position.

Miscellaneous items in this section
Pro-Line LPR wheels (17mm hex adapter needed)
M2C Racing machined aluminum 17mm hex hub adapters
Pro-Line LPR Holeshot™ tires
Pro-Line LPR BowTie™ tires
½-inch offset wheels
Wheel balancer from Ballistic Batteries™

Body and wing

I replaced the 1/8-scale wing and wing mount on my Revo with the new Traxxas Revo wing (#5412) and wing mount (#5411). The mount fits perfect and is a solid unit. It also allows you to adjust the height and rake of the wing, offering two positions for height and three positions for rake. The wing not only looks great, but is extremely durable. It holds its shape even after a ton of crashes.

The body is the new Pro-Line Crowd Pleazer™ 2.0 body and is extended on the left side to fit over the Resonator pipe without modification. I use the Revo extended rear body mount posts from Pro-Line to set the rear of the body at the proper height.

Parts used in this section
Part Number Part Name
#5412 Traxxas Revo wing
#5411 Traxxas wing mount
Miscellaneous items
Pro-Line Crowd Pleazer™ 2.0 body
Pro-Line extended rear body mount posts

Revo 3.3 Base Race Setup Sheet

Revo 3.3 Base Race Setup Sheet (Alternate)

Use this base set up sheet as a guide to get you started. As I mentioned before, setups will change from track to track and to also suit your particular driving style. Be sure to read all of my Revo setup guides to learn what each tuning option is designed to do and what to expect from each adjustment. It may take a while to soak in, but through practice and experimentation, you will learn exactly what to do when you're looking for maximum performance out of your Revo 3.3. Happy racing and good luck!

Complete Parts Summary

Traxxas Parts Used
Part Number Part Name
#5135 Traxxas differential fluid 10K weight
#5136 Traxxas differential fluid 30K weight
#5137 Traxxas differential fluid 50K weight
#5136X Traxxas differential oil kit (1 each: 10K, 30K, 50K weights)
#2717 Traxxas thrust bearing lube
#5338R Traxxas TUBES™ toe links
#5318X Traxxas aluminum pushrods with steel inserts
#5333R Traxxas Revo extended wheelbase suspension arms
#4045 Traxxas spring (from the Nitro 4-Tec)
#5460X Traxxas hard-anodized PTFE-coated GTR shocks
#5438 Traxxas Green springs
#5439 Traxxas Gold springs
#5498 Traxxas sway bars
#5383 Traxxas close-ratio two-speed gear set
#1647 Traxxas silicon grease
#5414 Traxxas Revo center differential
#5417 Traxxas Revo rear brake kit
#5364X Traxxas vented disc rotor
#3954 Traxxas 38T spur gear
#3955 Traxxas 40T spur gear
#5337 Traxxas skid plate set
#5288R Traxxas IPS crankshaft
#5274R Traxxas backplate
#5148 Traxxas white lithium grease
#5485 Traxxas Jato Resonator two-chamber exhaust pipe
#5412 Traxxas Revo wing
#5411 Traxxas wing mount
Miscellaneous items
Rotary power tool (for cutting and grinding)
Wear eye protection when using a rotary power tool
M2C Racing® engine mount brace
Pro-Line® aluminum steering arm
RD Racing® aluminum hub carriers
8.0mm axles
Large 8x16mm bearings
M2C Racing machined aluminum 17mm hex hub adapters
Zip-ties (small)
Ballistic Batteries™ five-cell 1400 Mah battery pack
2.4 GHz receiver and transmitter module
Extreme Racing™ throttle servo mount
Aftermarket 145cc fuel tank (made for 1/8-scale truggies)
Kydex® plastic
50wt - 60wt shock oil (mix for desired weight)
Sewing machine oil
Small springs (from ball point pen)
Solid turnbuckle link
3.0mm hardware
Rod end with hollow ball
Large thumbscrew
Starter box
M2C Racing three-shoe racing clutch (medium to hard, 0.95 & 1.0 springs)
1/8-scale buggy racing air filter (large cylindrical)
Shoe Goo®
Small piece of Lexan
Pro-Line LPR wheels (17mm hex adapter needed)
Pro-Line LPR Holeshot™ tires
Pro-Line LPR BowTie™ tires
½-inch offset wheels
Wheel balancer from Ballistic Batteries™
Pro-Line Crowd Pleazer™ 2.0 body
Pro-Line extended rear body mount posts
Using Traxxas Extended CV Driveshaft Rear Inner Drive Cups with Revo Extended Wheelbase Suspension Arms
Traxxas Spotlight: E-Maxx
Traxxas Slayer Setup & Tuning Guide
Slash Spec Racing Setup Guide
Convert a Universal Starter Box for Revo 3.3/Platinum
Revo Performance Set-Up Guide (part 3)
Revo Performance Set-Up Guide (Part 2)
Revo Performance Set-Up Guide (Part 1)