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  1. #1
    RC poster
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    How to get a softer ride with minimum sag?

    Title says it all. I'd like to tune my Slayer's suspension for some bumpy off-road driving at low to moderate speeds. I'm still not all that familiar with the Revo-style suspension, and the thing feels a bit too firm driving over anything. Albeit I've got a good amount of preload turned in to raise the ride height. But can't you adjust the ride height on it without adjusting preload? I thought the manual said so...

    Any ideas on how to tune my Slayer to soak up more bumps, and not stay low while driving? I could buy some parts (springs, etc), so don't hold back on those suggestions.

  2. #2
    RC Champion
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    I actually used turnbuckles to lower my slayer. No reason you couldn't use them to raise it too.

  3. #3
    RC Competitor
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    I'm new to RC cars, and haven't really dug into aftermarket shocks(yet lol), but I raced motocross for years so I am familiar with suspension. There are three adjustments, preload, compression, and rebound. Granted, RC shocks may be missing one or more of these adjustments. I'll explain each so you can determine what you need to do to reach the settings you want. It can be somewhat confusing, so feel free to ask questions if you need to.

    Preload is adjusted by the spacers(or threaded collar) between the top of the shock and the spring. This adjusts your ride height, or "sag." BUT, it also changes where your shock is at in it's range of travel. More spacers = higher ride height, but mean your shock nears the top of it's travel, meaning your tires will have less downward travel and more upward travel. More upward travel means the shock will have a longer stroke before bottoming out. Running less spacers will lower ride height, and will increase downward travel, meaning the car itself can move upward, and the tires still be on the ground. It will also be more likely to bottom out over large jumps. Ideally, your sag should be about 30% of your total travel. Meaning if you have 2" of travel, the difference between the car resting and unloaded(pull up on the rear until just before the tires lift off the ground) should be 0.6".

    Compression
    is usually a knob or screw on the shock. This is used to soften or stiffen the shock by regulating oil flow. Usually right = stiffer and left = softer. Pretty straight forward. With it set softer, your shocks will absorb more bumps and keep the tires on the ground, but will be more likely to bottom out on large jumps. If it's set stiffer, less likely to bottom out on large jumps, but a harsher ride through smaller choppy terrain, which can cause the car to bounce. It appears that on most RC cars with non-piggyback shocks it's often adjusted by swapping to a firmer or softer spring, instead of adjusting the oil flow.

    Rebound is found on the shaft end of the shock. It determines how quickly the shock returns to it's normal position. If it's set too high, the shock will kick when you leave jumps or hit bumps. If it's set to low, the shock will "pack up" if you hit several bumps in a row(like whoops), because after hitting the first bump the shock won't be able to return to its normal position before hitting the next bump, then you hit another bump and another bump and pretty soon your shock is out of travel. Too low of a setting would be like your shock taking 2 steps back, 1 step forward.

    Again, I'm new to RC cars, but it may help get you pointed in the right direction.
    Last edited by See Are125; 12-19-2013 at 08:14 PM.

  4. #4
    Marshal Double G's Avatar
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    You know the basics plus some. With RC, the weight of the oil can be replaced with thicker or thinner fluid. Obviously you'll need to match it with the appropriate weight spring. You could also replace the push rods with turnbuckles as shown above and adjust the height that way too.
    The Super Derecho

  5. #5
    RC poster
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    Not sure why I didn't think of the turnbuckle idea... What part # are we talking, though? As for the shock oil, the manual indicates that the shocks are filled with 30w from the factory. Refilling them with lighter oil would allow for quicker action and thus be softer, correct?

  6. #6
    RC Champion
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    Im not sure about part number. I just started fitting up whatever I had in spare parts. (I have tons of parts) By using the turnbuckles all you really need to do is adjust your spring tension to get a softer ride. Right now you have them maxxed out to get your desired height. Your gonna be getting all the right height you want out of whatever turnbuckle you choose. Plus you have a little adjustment for that ride height. Start off with your spring tension completely let off. Then adjust from there.
    Get yourself a set of turnbuckles for the Stampede or Rustler VXL. You may need to mix and match your ball ends to get what you want. You will need to use the pivot balls from the stock pushrods. No big deal to pop them out.
    For Less than $20 you make your Slayer nearly any height you want.
    It sounds as if your trying to make it a little more like a crawler. Try getting the Long Travel Rocker arms from the revo. That paired with the turnbuckles should produce the amount of oscillation your looking for.


    At one time my slayer looked like this.
    Last edited by Powerman; 12-20-2013 at 11:33 AM.

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