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  1. #1
    RC poster
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    Apr 2013
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    10

    Better slipper pads?

    Howdy all,

    Still new to my Revo Nitro and have run about 7 tanks through it. I am having an issue with my slipper pads. Had to replace my first set after my 1st tank during engine break in. I just burned out another set this week. So my two questions are:
    1. Can a my Revo be run around my yard with freshly cut grass. Got 2 back forth runs through my yard and the pads where gone. First time I got new pads, the guy at the hobby store asked if I was running it on grass.
    2. Are there better pads out there?

    Thanks,
    Tom

  2. #2
    RC Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    33
    Traxxas makes a kit with metal pads but I would check if your slipper clutch is to tight (I have mine about 3/4 to a full turn out from tight) it took me a while to eat up the pads and I have not installed the metal set yet. Below is the kit with the aluminum friction pads.

    5352R Rebuild kit (heavy duty), slipper clutch (steel disc/ aluminum
    friction pads (3)/ spring, Revo (1)/ spring, Maxx (1)/ 2x9.8mm
    pin/ 5x8mm MW/ 5.0mm NL (1)/ 4.0mm NL (1)) ............................. $9.50

    Joe

  3. #3
    RC poster
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    Apr 2013
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    Thanks Joe. That is what I did when I replaced them. Tightened, then backed out about 1/2 - 3/4 turn. Maybe I will try again and also get the heavy duty rebuild kit. See what happens.

  4. #4
    Marshal Double G's Avatar
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    May 2008
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    9,409
    How have you burned through them? I have yet to replace a slipper pad after five years of use. A properly set slipper and routine maintenance to remove the glazing helps. Also a little dab of tire glue to the back of the pad keeps them on the clutch so I don't lose any.
    The Super Derecho

  5. #5
    RC poster
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    10
    The first ones were loose from the factory and this being my first RC, I didn't know to check them. The second set, I have no idea. I had just put them on the week before. I tightened the slipper down and backed it off about 1/2 turn. Was running the truck through some grass that had been recently cut. Pulled the throttle and nothing. Checked and the pads where gone. Might try the tire glue trick also.

  6. #6
    RC Champion
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    2,153
    Tightened, then backed out about 1/2 - 3/4 turn
    This is not the correct way to set the slipper. You always start loose, then tighten till you find the correct setting. If you tighten it too much, you have to back it off and start over. I understand you may have searched the forum, and read the "tighten then loosen" method many times. You will not find this method described in the Revo manual. It is the lazy man's way of setting the slipper, and it is also the quickest path to having problems with the slipper setting. I don't give two hoot's what anyone says, fundamentaly you never tighten a fastner of any sorts, then back it off. Try it with the lug nut's of your 1:1 car then get back to me. Try it with the cylinder head bolts of the engine in your 1:1 car and then see how much anti-freeze ends up in your cylinders within the first half hour of running the engine. I realize I am giving extreme examples, but they are also clear and obvious, aren't they?

    Right off the bat, you are flattening the two belleville washers, and then expecting them to spring back into shape and hold tension. They are not designed to work like that. The first time you tightened the slipper down all the way, you compromised the integrity of these washers. Each time you tighten down the slipper all the way, you are further weakening the washers. Just in this thread, you described doing it twice. I would be looking at replacing these washers. Eventualy, they remain flat, and at that point you need to replace them anyway. Most likely your slipper is slipping too much and burning up the pads. They can only take so much heat before they disingrate, and break into pieces.

    Now, I have my own method in regard to the slipper, and I have not touched my slipper setting in years (yes, years), and have run many gallons of fuel using this same slipper assembly. I have no need to adjust it, 'cause it stays right where I set it. Let me do a little copy and paste here;

    I put a small o-ring between the bellville washers. The o-ring should be a little smaller in dia. than the bellvilles, but thick enough that when the assembly is hand tightened, the bellvilles will not touch each other. I tighten the slipper nut to the point that the bellvilles touch. The o-ring provides tension on the slipper, without having to over tighten the nut.

    Running through grass is abusive to the clutch and slipper assemblies, which is why the hobby store employee asked.
    Believe 1/2 of what you see,and 0 of what you hear

  7. #7
    RC Champion
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    Mar 2009
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    1,829
    never had issues with my slipper clutch either.. and i tighten and run it on the street see if i like it.. then if i don't i bring it and go 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn, depending on how loose it feels, until i get my desired point
    you know.. i never had a sig.. but i do now...

  8. #8
    RC poster
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    Apr 2013
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    3
    Yep, me too. I havent changed my set since I bought my truck. I bought my truck when it came out with the 3.3 engine and extended chassis. When I bought it , mine was slipping to much until it engaged, so I started tightening it slowly till I got a perfect setting between stoping my car with my foot and throttle it and it engage slightly but it wont break any gears, But strong enough that I can do wheelies with it. It needs to feel and sound like when you take a real car out of first gear...
    First, this is an example:
    1- Real car=too tight is like taking the clutch too fast, it will stall.
    - RC Truck=too tight it will move with no throttle.

    2- Real car=to loose is like accelerating the car a lot and taking the clutch slowly, you'll burn the clutch.
    - RC truck=to loose and the truck would move slowly even at full throttle while burning the pads.

    So try to find the happy medium, which it will get out of the grass quick without slipping to much while putting some throttle to it. Or just go to youtube and search for people bashing and listen and look how their cars move in relativity with the sound of their throttle and you'll have a better idea of how your car should move with how much throttle and compare it with yours.
    Hope I could help. Plus I used my truck in small jumps, grass no too tall (like golf grass), road dirt and some mud and still have my slipper with a lot of surface on it still

  9. #9
    RC Champion
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    Mar 2009
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    1,829
    Quote Originally Posted by TOORBO View Post
    Yep, me too. I havent changed my set since I bought my truck. I bought my truck when it came out with the 3.3 engine and extended chassis. When I bought it , mine was slipping to much until it engaged, so I started tightening it slowly till I got a perfect setting between stoping my car with my foot and throttle it and it engage slightly but it wont break any gears, But strong enough that I can do wheelies with it. It needs to feel and sound like when you take a real car out of first gear...
    First, this is an example:
    1- Real car=too tight is like taking the clutch too fast, it will stall.
    - RC Truck=too tight it will move with no throttle.

    2- Real car=to loose is like accelerating the car a lot and taking the clutch slowly, you'll burn the clutch.
    - RC truck=to loose and the truck would move slowly even at full throttle while burning the pads.

    So try to find the happy medium, which it will get out of the grass quick without slipping to much while putting some throttle to it. Or just go to youtube and search for people bashing and listen and look how their cars move in relativity with the sound of their throttle and you'll have a better idea of how your car should move with how much throttle and compare it with yours.
    Hope I could help. Plus I used my truck in small jumps, grass no too tall (like golf grass), road dirt and some mud and still have my slipper with a lot of surface on it still

    the bold section is an in-accurate statement... if your truck is moving with no throttle input, your idle is to high or your clutch (not slipper) is engaging to early, this is not related to slipper clutch... if this was teh case you are saying that the slipper clutch should be slipping at idle?
    you know.. i never had a sig.. but i do now...

  10. #10
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Nitronaught's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    South Florida
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    In history, if you ever ran your slipper a bit too loose for too long you can glaze the disc. This has happened to me but I had found a bad bearing in my pinion of my diff was causing a lot of un-needed change of load on the slipper. More than it should of coarse... The stock slippers seem to hold up pretty good unless you are on the throttle a bit too much when landing off a jump, that's definitely going to require more maintenance than if you are able to land a bit easier....

    Always a good idea to go over your driveline, go to where the joints/knuckles of the shafts are at each end, check the diff bearings by turning them by hand and wiggling them checking for excess play... One bad bearing can send you round and round trying to find a problem so just eliminate it with a 10 minute test... ...

    Your spur gear seems to be in good shape from the teeth...
    Founder of H.U.A.
    Hop Ups Anonymous

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