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Thread: Dog Bones?

  1. #1
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    Dog Bones?

    Please excuse my ignorance but what are dog bones and what do they do? I googled it and came up with nothing.

  2. #2
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Cameron's Avatar
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    Dog bone is a type of drive axle, it is a bar with a t-cross on both ends and it fits in between drive cups.



    Vs a CVD for comparison which has at least one contained end.
    (RAH) (AH) + [ROMA (1+MA)] + (GA) + (OOH)(LA)

  3. #3
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    Ok, now what would be the benefit of them versus the standard cvd.

  4. #4
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Cameron's Avatar
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    I want to say CVD are better, but if im wrong im sure someone will chime in.
    (RAH) (AH) + [ROMA (1+MA)] + (GA) + (OOH)(LA)

  5. #5
    RC Racer
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    The Dog bones have a solid core and can be heat tempered for unbelievable strength. And are very strong. Cvd's have joints and wings and c-clamps and pins that can wear out break under the Brushless Motors power and torque. It comes down to what do you want to break. If your building a bullet proof RC Dog Bones would be a good start.
    For E-revos we are using the Long Shaft Summit Drive Shafts on all fours. Because they are strong and have flex that is needed for the angle of approach as the a arms flex up and down.
    Last edited by clp71220; 01-02-2013 at 11:51 PM.

  6. #6
    RC Qualifier
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    One of the things I really dislike about dog-bones myself is that they can pop out. CVD's with telescoping shafts to not.

    I personally use MIP X-Spline CVDs. They've been pretty good to me.

    Dog-bones use a dog-bone shaped shaft and two outdrives. The pins that are pressed into the drive shaft can shear just as easily as the pin in CVD's though some aftermarket dog-bones have incredibly large pins and outdrives designed for them.

    CVD's come in two flavors. 2 CV joints and a telescoping shaft, or 1 CV joint and a dog-bone joint.

    In both the dog-bone and CV/dog-bone setup the outdrive/dogbone joint allows the shaft to move in and out in the outdrive to allow for movement of the shaft.

    In a 2 CV joint setup you have to have a shaft that has a telescoping joint.

    Summit shafts, stock shafts, and MIP shafts all use the telescoping drive shaft between two joints. The stock shafts are universals which work pretty well but don't maintain constant velocity from the input to the output.

    Summit and MIP CVD shafts have 2 CV joints and maintain that constant velocity through the system.

    Here's a good video to learn more about CV joints. Specifically what CV means.

    Keep in mind when watching the video RC CV joints don't use the ball style joint except for TVR who does.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEvaOg7glKk

  7. #7
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    Thank you guys very much. I am learning so much about this hobby daily.

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