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Thread: Slash gearing?

  1. #1
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    Slash gearing?

    My girlfriend and I have been bashers now for 6 months. I have a 2x4 slash with stock gearing. I have a 5800kv fuse brushless system. And I normally run around 5000 to 5300 mah 2 cell lipo. The motor seems to run hot most of the time, I do have a fan on the esc. In my opinion my gearing my be a little high. Taking all that in consideration I want to go to my local short course track which is moist hard pack.... I would appreciate any opinion on gearing and tire. Also I have Traxxas Big bore shocks can you recommend oil weight....? thanks so much..

  2. #2
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. 08kgraves's Avatar
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    do you have a temp gun? what i thought was to warm was actually nowhere close to the limits of the motor. only real way to know if your safe is to check your motor temps. for example if your brushless setup is probably safe on the motor side upwards of 170 degrees. so any gearing under that is fine. now electric motors are 100% torque instantly so best way to figure out if you need a lower gearing than a safe temp wise gearing is to go and run the track. slowly gear down to where you can get good run on the straits but have enough time to slow down and corner.

    as for suspension and tire setups and selection thats a entire different beast. suspension being the hard one. tires it just depends on the type of track mostly. im in the process of writing a detailed how to for steering and suspension and tire selection. already have tire section written so this is a copy and paste.

    Tire selection is a key in any setup because weather you have the correct suspension setup or not tires are ultimately responsible for transferring the power to the ground. The first step in tire selection is to assess the terrain on which you will be running. Is the surface loose? Is it hard packed? For general bashing it is almost imposible to pick a tire that will work best for every surface, so you have to make compromises when looking for tires for this purpose. This is more of a tire selection how to for a track setup. To get started lets get the understanding of some simple terms down. Loamy is another word for a soft packed track where there is a lot of looseness like top soil for example. Firmer tracks are known as hard packed and sometimes get what is known as a blue groove on them. Blue groove meaning that there is a visible line on the track where rubber has built up making an extremely hard surface that yields high grip as well.

    The best way to identify the track surface is to walk around and poke varying spots on the track to see how far your finger will penetrate the surface. This is most important on dirt as the condition can be infanitly varying. Concrete or carpet tracks are much easier to make the proper tire selection as they stay much more consistant. If you can penetrate the track surface fairly easily and fairly deep then it is a soft packed dirt. If you get little or no penetration of the track surface then it is a hard packed dirt. Soft packed dirt tires need to have longer pins that are more spread out to gain the most traction. This is necessary so the tire pins can dig through the softer dirt and get down to more firm surface for best traction. While completely opposite for hard packed tracks. Hard packed tracks will require shorter pins that are closer together for the most traction. If the track is hard you want the most rubber contact to achieve maximum traction. Tires designed for blue groove tracks are slightly different yet. They have very very few pins so that you can get an almost slick tire for most tractions. They often have a zig zag pattern on the edge for most side bite possible to increase conering speed. And the sole purpose of the pins it does have is to expel any light dirt from times when you are not on the blue groove line.

    After you have selected the appropriate pin setup for your running area it is time to look into the tire compound. This meaning how hard or soft the rubber of the tire is. The harder the compound the less traction in its own, but longer tread life. The opposite applies for soft compound tires. The softer the rubber the more traction they will give you but the more often they will need to be replaced. You must put the proper compound with the proper tire though. Longer more spread out pins designed for loamy conditions will need to be of a harder compound. This is to keep the longer length of the pins from folding under itself. As for hard packed or blue groove tracks they are the opposite. Since the pins are shorter and closer together they are less likely to fold over itself so using a softer compound will allow the tire to grip more and form around every little imperfection of the track to yield maximum traction.

    As the day goes on you will usually need several different tires in order to achieve maximum grip throughout the day. You can never have to many tires selections on hand to choose from. Multiple tires to choose from will also be good for you if you’re the type of person who goes to multiple tracks without necessarily knowing the condition of the track. So access your local playground and pick the tire to best suit it.




    for suspension oil weight depends on the spring selection. start by picking the springs that will keep your setup balanced from front to rear. once there balanced you can step everything up or down evenly slowly to get the spring rate you need depending on your local track. once you have the proper springs you can move on to oils. start out with a light oil and slowly step up to heavier. you have to keep making passes after each change. when the vehicle end (front or back) no longer becomes bouncy then you have the right weight of oil in that end for those springs. its all about trial and error. theres more adjustments as well you can change but i dont want to get into those right now. to much information at once can be a bad thing lol
    there's no life like a LOW LIFE!
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  3. #3
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    08kgraves covered all of it . you can also stand back see who the faster guys are , peek at the tire selection when they are in the pits,what colour springs , you can also run what you brung . get used to the traffic , once you are comfy in the thick of things get into the fine art of tunning . again 08kgraves is bang on with the tuning side , focus on being clean and consistant , this will take some time as well as understanding the magics and myths of tunning .

    and a....... have fun

  4. #4
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. O.G.'s Avatar
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    You say your motor runs hot and you think the gearing is too high.. what gearing do you have?

    And a lot of guys paint their springs black to confuse the competition.
    My Black & Blue Rally is faster than your color...

  5. #5
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. 08kgraves's Avatar
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    spring selection will depend on driving style as well. first think you have to do is get a wide variety of springs for the front and rear. take the oil out and do a bounce test. drop the car from 5 or 6 inches and see which end springs up faster. whichever end comes back up first has the higher spring rate. so you can either put stiffer springs on the slow end to increase spring rate. or ligher springs on the opposite side to decrease spring rate. you want to start off on the weak side and just slowly speed it up until your not rates are equal despite the front to back weight difference. once the spring rate is equal you can either add equally all the way around or take away equally all the way around. this way you can keep the car bouncing evenly. after that you have to slowly add heavier and heavier fluid to fronts or backs at a time until the car does not bounce around after jumps. when either the front or back stops bouncing you have the right shock oil for your springs. to keep from having to buy every shock oil on the market you can swap out the pistons inside the shock to more or less holes to act as if your using heavier or lighter oil. thats not explained out the way i would like to 100% but i havent gotten this section written yet. hope it helps you though.

    and i would also like to know what gearing you have. im only on the stock velineon brushless system system but im running 76t spur with 23t pinion for example and my motor temp is about 150 degrees.
    there's no life like a LOW LIFE!
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