Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    53

    changing pinion gear

    Hey guys, I just got my stampede a couple days ago. It is my first hobby grade rc car. I was doing some research trying to figure out how to replace the stock pinion gear with the high speed one. I can't seem to find any information on how to do it. Do i just remove the gear cover and change it like that or do I need to take the entire motor out? Also will I be able to do this with just the tools that came with my truck because I read somewhere that I need a gear puller or I will damage my engine. Please help a noob out! Thanks guys.

  2. #2
    RC Champion
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Port Alice, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,279
    I was in the same boat you were not to long ago and I am still a noob but learning everyday. You have to take the gear cover off, loosen the engine screw or else you wont be able to pull the pinion out ( the chassis gets in the way ). Once that's done put in the optional 17t pinion and set your gear mesh. If you need help adjusting gear mesh that's in your manual. Good Luck and have fun with your new pede it's a awesome truck. And yes you can do this with the tools provided.
    R4lly GT8 | Backsl4sh | Sl4sh MT | Sl4sh | P4de

  3. #3
    RC Champion
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Inver Grove Heights, MN
    Posts
    1,541
    Remember not to let the truck get to hot with the 17t pinion or you will be in for some unexpected problems due to overheating. Have fun and try not to smash it up!
    So I taped my hamster to the Pede..

  4. #4
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    53
    thanks so much guys! i tried taking the gear cover off but there only appears to be one screw and the gear cover wont budge. do i need to loosen the engine to take the gear cover off?

  5. #5
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    53
    also will i have problems with overheating if i have both a motor heatsink and an esc fan?

  6. #6
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. asheck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    7,361
    The gear cover can be tight, take the screw out, and just pry it off. I would only go up 1 gear at a time, and check temps frequently . A motor heatsink is more of a temperature regulator, then a temperature controller. IOW Yes, the motor cans temps normally go lower, but what was making the motor run hot in the first place, was not changed.
    _
    _
    _ 3 lines are all that's allowed in a sig.

  7. #7
    RC Champion
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    camillus, ny
    Posts
    2,560
    Quote Originally Posted by asheck View Post
    The gear cover can be tight, take the screw out, and just pry it off. I would only go up 1 gear at a time, and check temps frequently . A motor heatsink is more of a temperature regulator, then a temperature controller. IOW Yes, the motor cans temps normally go lower, but what was making the motor run hot in the first place, was not changed.
    I keep hearing that adding a Heat sink only covers up the issue. And i completely disagree, Cooling devices have been around a long time. They help keep heat low so we can extract more performance out of the product being cooled. wether it be computers, or cars, even electric motors. The important part about heat-sinks (just like any other cooling system) There are good ones, cheap ones, and awesome ones. If i were serious about using a heat sink, i would do some research on the subject. Using a black heat sink will have better cooling properties then red or purple or blue. And keep in mind how much contact the heat sink actually makes with the motor. The more the better, also using a computer grade thermal compound can increase the cooling effectiveness a ton. Also make sure your heat sink has a thick durable construction, that way i keeps its shape and keeps the best contact with your motor. Using a fan in conjunction with your heat sink can really boost your attempts to keeping the motor cool. But not all fans are created equal, rpm and blade design can severely impact its performance. Take a look at the cfm if your fan has one listed on it. This number is the reading for air's movement in cubic feet per minute. So the higher the number the better potential cooling you will have. Remember Science created these performance machines that we love so much, And cooling science can keep them cool while getting optimal performance.
    Man i need more than 50 characters.

  8. #8
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    53
    ****n thanks for the info. thats what i thought with the heatsink. i mean i have an upgraded heat sink on my cpu so that i can overclock why wouldnt this work the same way

  9. #9
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. asheck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    7,361
    I keep hearing that adding a Heat sink only covers up the issue. And i completely disagree,
    That's because you don't fully understand, and are trying to relate it to objects that have no built in cooling. All motors will have a wattage and amp range that they are the most efficient at. When a motor is in that range it should not run to hot, as long as it is getting good airflow across the built in heatsink that it has, namely the motor can. As you place a higher load on the motor then it is built to handle, the efficiency drops, and your temps rise. Adding fans or heatsinks doesn't change the fact that the motor is being pushed to hard, it just makes your readable temps lower. This is why they make different sized motors, and not just bigger heatsinks, a bigger motor will make higher wattages more efficiently. The heatsinks only dissipate the extra heat, the motor is still creating the same amount. Also think about this, if the external temperature of 2 motors are the same, but one has a heatsink and fan, which do you think has the higher internal temperature?

    With brushless there are 2 things that will cause damage, heat, and amp load. As the heat inside the motor rises, the motor becomes more susceptible to damage from being over amped. One of the signs of being over amped, is heat. So if you hide the fact that the motor is making to much heat, it does nothing for the fact that the motor is still being over amped, and puts you on the edge of motor failure, all the time.

    BTW I'm not talking about , EX: I'm running 170, and want it to run cooler, so I use a heatsink, that drops temps to 150. That's a good thing. I'm talking about, EX, I'm running 170 geared 11/54, but want to run 17/54, so I add 2 heatsinks, a fan, and am still running 170. That's living on the edge of failure.


    The fact is that the VXL is really just to small of a motor to be pushed in a 4wd.
    i mean i have an upgraded heat sink on my cpu so that i can overclock why wouldnt this work the same way
    right, but there still is the point where add all the cooling you want, it can't be pushed further, also as you overclock more, the CPU becomes at a greated risk of failure.

    A couple more points. First, most all other electrical components have some sort of heat failsafe. If you overclock your computer to far, over heat your esc, ect. it generally will just need to be reset. A motor only tells you it was pushed to far, by failing. Fans, on an esc are one thing, as most have a built in temperature sensor, but if a fan goes out on your motor, and you are depending on it to keep it uder 200, then your motor will most likely fail.
    Last edited by asheck; 03-28-2011 at 12:51 PM.
    _
    _
    _ 3 lines are all that's allowed in a sig.

  10. #10
    RC Champion
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    camillus, ny
    Posts
    2,560
    Quote Originally Posted by asheck View Post
    That's because you don't fully understand, and are trying to relate it to objects that have no built in cooling. All motors will have a wattage and amp range that they are the most efficient at. When a motor is in that range it should not run to hot, as long as it is getting good airflow across the built in heatsink that it has, namely the motor can. As you place a higher load on the motor then it is built to handle, the efficiency drops, and your temps rise. Adding fans or heatsinks doesn't change the fact that the motor is being pushed to hard, it just makes your readable temps lower. This is why they make different sized motors, and not just bigger heatsinks, a bigger motor will make higher wattages more efficiently. The heatsinks only dissipate the extra heat, the motor is still creating the same amount. Also think about this, if the external temperature of 2 motors are the same, but one has a heatsink and fan, which do you think has the higher internal temperature?

    With brushless there are 2 things that will cause damage, heat, and amp load. As the heat inside the motor rises, the motor becomes more susceptible to damage from being over amped. One of the signs of being over amped, is heat. So if you hide the fact that the motor is making to much heat, it does nothing for the fact that the motor is still being over amped, and puts you on the edge of motor failure, all the time.

    BTW I'm not talking about , EX: I'm running 170, and want it to run cooler, so I use a heatsink, that drops temps to 150. That's a good thing. I'm talking about, EX, I'm running 170 geared 11/54, but want to run 17/54, so I add 2 heatsinks, a fan, and am still running 170. That's living on the edge of failure.


    The fact is that the VXL is really just to small of a motor to be pushed in a 4wd.
    right, but there still is the point where add all the cooling you want, it can't be pushed further, also as you overclock more, the CPU becomes at a greated risk of failure.

    A couple more points. First, most all other electrical components have some sort of heat failsafe. If you overclock your computer to far, over heat your esc, ect. it generally will just need to be reset. A motor only tells you it was pushed to far, by failing. Fans, on an esc are one thing, as most have a built in temperature sensor, but if a fan goes out on your motor, and you are depending on it to keep it uder 200, then your motor will most likely fail.
    asheck i agree with you, but in a nut shell adding extra cooling to a motor is not a bad thing, over gearing a motor is regardless of temps, i know this. but ambient temps have a huge effect on the motors temp. and i'm sorry but a flat surfaced can is hardly doing much for that motor. thats why adding a quality heat sink can help. and i agree the stock vxl motor is way to inefficient to run a 4wd truck with monster truck tires. maybe a stadium sized tire. But to the op adding a heat sink is never a bad idea. but if your temps are already in the danger zone shop for a different kv motor or change your gearing.
    Man i need more than 50 characters.

  11. #11
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    53
    thanks for the info that was an interesting discussion!

  12. #12
    RC Qualifier
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    360
    Or...or....or......or he can trying going the water cooled route! I'm still working on the radiator thing
    -Slash 4x4 MT 2000kv
    -Slash 4x4 MT 2100kv

  13. #13
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    53
    hahaha... or phase change...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •