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    Marshal Double G's Avatar
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    May 2008
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    Porting the sleeve

    I debated on putting this thread here or in the Engine section, but there is more traffic here, so...
    I’ve been thinking about doing this for quite a while and was going to wait until my engine decided to breathe its last breath. However, a big thanks goes to insanity for contributing a useless sleeve that he had lying around his workstation. The agreement was I would try it but I have to do a write-up on it and share with everyone here. Not a problem.
    I read up on porting at RC Universe; AB Mods; EB Mods; and whatever else I found using Google.
    Total time to do this was about an hour and a half; but that includes taking numerous photos and running back inside to check on the kids while they were napping.
    ****Disclaimer: Now just because I read up on all of this and did some research, I am by far no where near being a professional and do not claim that what I did will meet or exceed those that do this for a living. Do this at your own risk as I will not take blame if you screw up your engine. Given that this is a junk sleeve, I was not able to test it to verify the claims of more power and better mileage.****
    Background on the sleeve:
    Quote Originally Posted by insanity
    It was a new motor; ran it for one tank. After that he could not get it to start. The con rod went through the piston, and it fought like crazy getting it out. I could not use the force it out with the piston so I went caveman on it.
    Overall the inside is very nice and shiny and does not appear to have much wear to it at all. Even the exhaust port does not have burn marks to it. But one of the intake ports is marred a little bit. I did take a spare piston and it seems to have a bit of compression left.
    Ready? Here we go!

    Pic 1: Before porting; exhaust port on the right.



    Pic 2: Before porting; boost port on the right.



    Pic 3: Rounded bottom outer edge. I started with the sanding band but felt it left a lot of scratch marks. So I used the grinding wheel and it turned out pretty smooth. Followed it up with the wire brush and felt polisher. Ended up taking the brush and polisher to the entire outside of the sleeve. The nick you see in the bottom under the boost port is collateral damage from the piston/rod failure.



    Pic 4: Boost port. This seemed to be large enough and at a steep enough angle so I felt there was no need to make it bigger and only polished it.



    Pic 5: Using a Sharpie to determine the angle. It is hard to see but the port is already angled somewhat towards the area above the boost port. I’ve seen other sites (Misbehavin’s?) in the past that show you want to angle the cut towards an imaginary “X” above the boost port. The exhaust port is on the left.



    Pic 6: Sharpie again on the other side. Exhaust port on the right.



    Pic 7: Cut has been made and cleaned up. Other sites have said to cut the opening a little bigger on the outside (but don’t touch the inside of the sleeve!) but I decided to leave it. Make sure you have a steady hand. The stone slipped a few times and nicked the outside—which is probably no big deal but I also slipped and nicked the top of the port a couple times.



    Pic 8: The other side, again I slipped and really nicked the top of the port. The angle is not as clean as the other side and I took off a little of the outside of the port on the left side too.



    To be continued....
    Last edited by Double G; 03-11-2011 at 05:24 PM.
    The Super Derecho

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