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  1. #1
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    Question Can someone tell me the difference between a center diff and the slipper clutch

    whats better? why is one better, and what does the slippers actually do?

  2. #2
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    The slipper clutch ( at least when not fully tightened down) protects the rest of the driveline from the high torque of brushless motors. The spur gear can spin separately from the tranny, how much depends on how loosely you have it set.

    A center diff allows the front and rear wheels to spin at different speeds, just like the diff in the front and rear end allows the opposing wheels to spin at different speeds. Center diffs seem to mainly benefit those who race, for bashing the slipper clutch is the way to go....IMO that is
    -ERBE
    -Slash 4x4

  3. #3
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    A centre diff technical explanation:

    In normal operation, power is distributed equally to the front and rear wheels. Plates are alternately attached to the front and rear output shafts inside the viscous coupling. When a rotational difference occurs between the front and back wheels, the plates inside the viscous housing shear inside the contained fluid (a type of silicone) heating it and causing the fluid to thicken. The thickened fluid causes the plates to transfer torque from those that rotate faster (the slipping wheels) to the plates that rotate slower (the wheels with the best traction).

    Basically it would be near impossible to do wheelies with a center differential as when the front tire lift off the ground, the rear tires would be slowed to even out the power distribution.

    Slipper cluth: Like a locked diff. Front and rear wheels will always spin at the same speed. So if you grab the throttle you can maintain a wheelie.

    To sum it up:
    Centre diff will transfer torque between front and back based on traction

    Slipper is 50/50 distribution. Traxxas only rate the centre diff for 2s lipos. A Slipper with revo sized upgrades (plate and heavy duty pads) works well on higher powered setups
    SlashVXL-ERBE-Slash4x4PE-RustlerVXL-1/16SlashSW2

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonabernathy75 View Post
    whats better? why is one better, and what does the slippers actually do?
    The center diff's better....... IF you're on a track. As you stab the throttle comin' out of a corner, the car's weight will rock back to the rear, and once the front unloads, all your power spins the front tires about 100mph. This does two things. One, having all your power go up front allows the front (steering) wheels to pull you around on the line you want to follow. Second, all your power going out the front means very little power to the rear. If your rear (non-steering) wheels get too much power, they push the front end straight into the tubes/boards. No wheelies going this route, but better lap times, and easier to hold your line.

    The locked center diff is way better......... for backyard bashing, mudding, etc. Locking the center diff sends equal power to the front and rear at all times. This is great for wheelies, as all your power doesn't go up front. Also, when you're jumping (a ramp) with a center diff, once your fron wheels leave the ramp, there goes all your power, and the rear end usually winds up just "falling" off the ramp. By this time you've already lost a lot of speed and usually your nose goes down, and your truck lands on it's front bumper. With a locked center diff, once the front end leaves the ramp, there's still power at the rear pushing the truck up and away. More speed at the end of the ramp= better flights.

    The slipper just slips a little bit to take up any driveline shock from turning on a power source (in this case, your motor). Electric motors make 100% torque from startup, and the slipper just helps prevent broken parts. Properly adjusted, it'll slip for only the first 1-2 feet, then after that, you won't even know it's there. Once the truck's rolling, it takes very little to accelerate it.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys, let me ask this question, if i got motor oil on the slipper, would it cause the truck not to break right? my mechanic friend was over and put motor oil on the spur/pinion for lubercation and now it does not lock the wheels up anymore.

  6. #6
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    Spur / Pinion does not require lubrication

    Pull it apart and clean it, replace the spur if you need to

    Cheers

  7. #7
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    understand that, but would it cause braking issues?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonabernathy75 View Post
    Thanks guys, let me ask this question, if i got motor oil on the slipper, would it cause the truck not to break right? my mechanic friend was over and put motor oil on the spur/pinion for lubercation and now it does not lock the wheels up anymore.
    Probably got some lube on the slipper pads, which would cause it to slip more at a given setting so yes that could cause your brakes not to work as good and slow your acceleration...as crusy said, clean all that lube off of there, you'll have to take apart the slipper clutch and clean it too.
    -ERBE
    -Slash 4x4

  9. #9
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    thanks guys, will do

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebailey95 View Post
    A centre diff technical explanation:
    Slipper is 50/50 distribution. Traxxas only rate the centre diff for 2s lipos. A Slipper with revo sized upgrades (plate and heavy duty pads) works well on higher powered setups
    Hi Ebailey95,
    can you tell me the parts needed to make the revo slipper upgrade?
    thanks

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by a1000k View Post
    Hi Ebailey95,
    can you tell me the parts needed to make the revo slipper upgrade?
    thanks
    Just get a erevo slipper kit and you should have everything you need..
    -ERBE
    -Slash 4x4

  12. #12
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    you need the following part # for the revo clutch:

    TRA5351
    and
    TRA5352X OR 5352R

    i run the 5253r in my 2 slash 4x4 and my rally
    Drive it.Break it.ebuild it.

  13. #13
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    Personally I prefer the center diff in the slash 4x4.
    Some of the explanations I see here are somewhat accurate but not totally.
    Given the the front, center and rear all have the same weight diff fluid it will transfer power to the rear when the front loses traction and make it hard to pull wheelies. This is where fluid tuning comes into play. Power follows the path of least resistance. The higher you go in the weight of the lube in the center diff the more power goes to the front. Its a delicate balancing act.

    The slipper will distribute weight evenly given that the front and rear diffs have the same lube. Increase the weight in the front and decrease the weight in the rear and more power goes to the rear. The inverse is also true.

    If you are on a track a slipper cant hold a candle to a center diff. When the lubes are properly balanced you can enter a turn still under power and let off a little then power out halfway through the turn. Cant do that with a slipper. The rear end will attempt to pass the front end every time.

    For bashing its all about preference. I prefer the center diff for better steering control in all situations, on the track and off.

    If you are running the plastic spur lube isnt needed. If its loud and binding the gear mesh is set too tight. I run hardened steel on both the pinion and spur and use a little dry graphite.

  14. #14
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    I do not race or go to the track. Run a lot in the street and some dirt. I have the center dif in now but was thinking of going to the revo slipper set up. I use the 3s with stock gears. My stock slipper was trashed when I used the truck in sand with paddles.
    Any thoughts? Good or bad idea?

  15. #15
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    If your just doing street and dirt, get the Revo slipper. I did it in one of my rallys I did the Mamba monster upgrade to. Best decision possible. It'll handle pretty much anything you throw at it. If it handles 6s in a rally, you'll be fine.

  16. #16
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    To the OP...
    With the center diff installed and all three have the same fluid, your truck will drive like a real all wheel drive car. Transfering power to the wheels with more grip. With the slipper, it'll drive like a real 4x4. All power, all the time, to all wheels.

  17. #17
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    Think I'm going to try the revo slipper. What the **** is a few more bucks. Is it bad when your LHS knows your name??

  18. #18
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    It's only $10 and should last you a long time. Money well spent.

  19. #19
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    Ok So I now have the new slipper and I can not see a diffrance over the stock one. What am I missing??
    I did use the 5352X as the R was not in stock.

  20. #20
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    I did use the heavy duty R rebuild kit. The X is the same as stock. I should've explained better. I apologize.

  21. #21
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    Its ok. Just another trip to the LHS and 8 more bucks. Was not in stock or I would have done the R the first time.

  22. #22
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    I know this is an older thread but I am glad to have found it as I just purchased my first Slash 4x4 LCG (Platinum version) and I did install the center diff. I had no real idea why the center diff was better but with this thread and other information I received from others it has answered my question. This diff should and seems to function like an all wheel drive vehical. Which I hope will allow me to beat my 13 year old grandson. He has one of thoes SC-10 4X4 (traitor) he learned on one of my 2wd Slash's and a Bandit. His dad bought the SC-10 for him.

    At the track (clay surface) I drive my 2wd Slash just a little better than he drive his 4x4, but last weekend he gave me a real close run, the 4x4 just gets around a little easier. So now that I have a 4x4, maybe grandpa can stay way out front.

    Wish me luck as tomorrow, the boy and I will meet again battle of the 4x4's. Old men (grandpa's) rule.
    "enjoy your ride"

    Dennis

  23. #23
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    You must be driving up at SDRC! I'm terrible on that track.

  24. #24
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    Ya, SDRC is where we go to practice. Having never drove on a clay surface, I had trouble there the first time mainly due to the fact I did not have clay tires.

    Even the second time with clay tires, it took some getting use to all the traction. Then having to set the truck up for the truck for clay verse out door on loose soil over hard pack. I now keep one of my 2wd Slashes set up for the clay and the other for out door fun here on our track at home.

    It has taken some time but my speed and control is improving and may even enter a race soon just to say I tried it.

    As far as skill level for me I'd just say " better than some, worst than others".
    "enjoy your ride"

    Dennis

  25. #25
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    I have a hard time with the back straightaway, my depth perception isn't as good as I thought it was

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