Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Banned by Warnings
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    sutton, mass
    Posts
    335

    difference between 2 amp and 4 amp charging?

    what is it?

  2. #2
    RC Champion
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Edmond, OK
    Posts
    1,596
    Its how many amps the charger is using to put energy into the battery. 4 amps will be faster and 2 amps will be slower
    -Brendan

  3. #3
    RC Qualifier
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Redlands, CA
    Posts
    878
    One time, I had a charger that charged batteries with 2.5 amps and now I have a Black Widow Peak Charger and I can charge batteries with 2 amps and 4 amps and well, when I charged batteries with the charger that charged with 2.5 amps, I had shorter runtime than I had with the charger that charged batteries with 2 amps and 4 amps. So I think you get shorter runtime when you charge batteries with a lower amp.
    selling Stampede.

  4. #4
    RC Champion
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    is it snowing yet, Erie Pa
    Posts
    1,309
    this is how I understand it.. I've not had specific real world experience so look to others to confirm what I say.

    When you charge at a lower amp rating it will take longer but you should see a bit longer run times. Perhaps not as much punch either.

    When you charge at a higher amp rating you will get faster charge time, more punch initially, and perhaps slightly shorter run times in comparison to a lower amp charge.

    Since I'm not 100% on this I usually throw these posts out and then arcee/highlanduh/misbehavin/swami confirm if I'm close.

    The key to going really fast is in the hands of the guy that just passed you....

  5. #5
    RC Qualifier
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kenosha
    Posts
    719
    Originally posted by eri3f0g

    When you charge at a lower amp rating it will take longer but you should see a bit longer run times. Perhaps not as much punch either.

    When you charge at a higher amp rating you will get faster charge time, more punch initially, and perhaps slightly shorter run times in comparison to a lower amp charge.


    You are correct in your assesment eri3f0g.

    More current = more punch and shorter run times.
    Less current = less punch and longer run times.

    I have question to throw out on this subject as well. It isn't really an RC question more of an electrical one, but here it is anyway.

    According to ohms law voltage = current * resistance. If this is the case, how is the current being increased through the charger? Is it just by increasing the voltage going to the battery? That would make sense mathematicaly, but i am not sure this is the way it is done.
    Thanks, DaveO

    "It's too bad Ignorance isn't painful!"

  6. #6
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Highlanduh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    3,431
    Originally posted by eri3f0g
    Since I'm not 100% on this I usually throw these posts out and then arcee/highlanduh/misbehavin/swami confirm if I'm close.
    Wow. How flattering to be grouped with those guys...

    Anyway, based on what I've read your post is accurate.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  7. #7
    RC Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    46

    Surprising Charging instructions from Trinity..

    I have read a lot of place to charge NiMH batteries at 3 amps. The instructions with my Trinity GP3300s said 3-4 amps to balance perf vs runtime.

    The web site says 5 amps.. nothing like consistancy from a vendor


    1) What amp rate should I charge my NimH batteries at?
    We recommend to charge at 5 amps for race conditions. If you charge higher, you'll get more acceleration early, but in some cases they flatten out toward the end of the race. This is also harder on the cell and will decrease the overall life of the cell. We do not recommend charging at 7 amps or higher.
    http://www.teamtrinity.com/tips/batts.asp

    STnewbie

  8. #8
    Banned by Warnings
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    california
    Posts
    522

    ill use my racer knowlege to basher here

    generally STnewbie,

    racers with put there batteries to the max to get the most punch possible for a race due to them only needing it for 5 mins.for a basic battery charging rule to go by i have always used for nicads just messing around is say you have a 1500 nicad.what you wanna do is multiply the mah by 2....1500x2=3000 and add a decimal after the 1st number=3.0 and that is what you would generally charge a 1500 nicad at for best ovral perfomance.

    now if you have a charger which only goes 2 or 4 amps you can go 2amps and get more of a run but the pack will feel flat.ive used a dynamite peak at 4 amps for 1500s here and it a better way to go.nicad
    1500=3.0amps
    1700=3.4amps
    1800=3.6amps
    2400=4.8amps you get the idea
    thought you can round up like 2400 at 5 amps max for bashin or 15-1900s at 4 amps max without toasting em
    nimh is different they get hotter when charged faster than nicads do
    Last edited by razer; 01-03-2004 at 02:16 PM.

  9. #9
    RC Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    46

    Thanks

    Thanks xmans revenge,

    I do follow your post and it will change how I charge the kids diff sized nicads.

    STnewbie

  10. #10
    RC Qualifier
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Henderson, KY
    Posts
    343
    Constantly charging at a high amp rating will also keep your batteries from lasting as long as they would with a low amp rating. This is why racers have to spend so much time taking care of their batteries. Alot of cycling is involved. My buddies and I charge our packs at around 5-6 amps when we get to the track, and re-peak them before every race.

    Word of wisdom....dont get into racing if you dont like/or dont know how to maintain batteries and motors.

    Preston
    Team Losi XXX-NT- Racing (hopups)
    Nitro Rustler FOR SALE, SEE MARKET
    AE T4- Racing

  11. #11
    RC poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    12
    DaveO
    The way chargers change Amps is by lowering it... How, the charger is actually rated at lets say 4.5A max, so you get to choose from a smaller amp rate of 2A up to 4.5A. There is ways to increase voltage but at the cost of the amperage decrease... The charger will not generate more amperage than that what is put out by the Power Supply...
    Was it clear, thats as lame as I can put it.
    Joey

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •